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Monday, April 20, 2020 | History

4 edition of Nuclear weapons and international law in the post Cold War world found in the catalog.

Nuclear weapons and international law in the post Cold War world

Charles J. Moxley

Nuclear weapons and international law in the post Cold War world

  • 125 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by University Press of America in Lanham .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nuclear weapons (International law),
  • Nuclear nonproliferation.,
  • Nuclear arms control -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    StatementCharles J. Moxley, Jr ; with forewords by Robert S. McNamara, David W. Leebron, Kosta Tsipis.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKZ5665 .M69 2000
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxx, 813 p. ;
    Number of Pages813
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18287407M
    ISBN 101572921528
    LC Control Number00029866

      The immediate aftermath of the Cold War opened a new era of global issues with the proliferation of conventional weapons. ‘Conventional weapons’ is a term used to cover arms that are not nuclear, biological or chemical in nature, otherwise known as Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDs).


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Nuclear weapons and international law in the post Cold War world by Charles J. Moxley Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Charles Moxley's thesis that nuclear weapons violate international law may be this century's most important advance towards a peaceable world order. His book should make you worry, make you think and above all, impel you to make his case against nuclear weapons your case"Jerome J.

Shestack, Past President, American Bar Association Read more. Nuclear Weapons and International Law in the Post Cold War World is an unprecedented exploration of the application of the necessity, proportionality and discrimination of principles of international law to nuclear weapons.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. 5/5(1). NWLA grows out of the work by Charles J. Moxley, Jr. in writing Nuclear Weapons and International Law in the Post Cold War World (Austin & Winfield, University Press of America, ), analyzing the rules of international law applicable to the use of nuclear weapons.

Synopsis: Nuclear Weapons and International Law in the Post Cold War World. Charles J. Moxley, Jr. With Forewords by Robert S. McNamara David W. Leebron Kosta Tsipis. Austin & Winfield, University Press of America () This book analyzes the lawfulness of the use of nuclear weapons under established rules of international law.

Since the beginning of the Cold War, nuclear weapons have played a crucial role in the international community, shaping the behavior of states and their actions in relationship to one another.

Throughout the twentieth-century, nuclear weapons got deadlier; their range and power have both increased, bringing the potential for greater devastation to the globe.

Nuclear Weapons and International Law in the Post Cold War World by New York attorney and former St. John's law professor Charles Moxley contends that the use of nuclear weapons is per se unlawful based upon rules of international law recognized by the United States and facts beyond reasonable dispute.

Despite not having been used in anger since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the atomic bomb is still the biggest threat that faces us in the 21st century. As Bill Clinton's first secretary of defense, Les Aspin, aptly put it, The Cold War is over, the Soviet Union is no more.

But the post-Cold War world is decidedly not post-nuclear. For all the effort to reduce nuclear stockpiles to zero, it. This volume includes a representative selection of Sidney Drell''s recent writings and speeches (circa to the present) on public policy issues with substantial scientific components.

Most of the writings deal with national security, nuclear weapons, and arms control and reflect the authorOCOs personal involvement in such issues dating back to /5(1).

“This book is Frank Gavin at his best. One of the nation's most brilliant international scholars, a leading expert on Cold War and nuclear history, Gavin insists on grappling with what happened. Nuclear Weapons is a concise intro to and history of nuclear weapons development My edition takes up to the early aught's and thus do not address developments over the last 15 years.

Yet, I learned some new and interesting facts about the nuclear world that had been omitted from larger more detailed books on the subject of nuclear weapons/5(15). A nuclear weapon (also called an atom bomb, nuke, atomic bomb, nuclear warhead, A-bomb, or nuclear bomb) is an explosive device that derives its destructive force from nuclear reactions, either fission (fission bomb) or from a combination of fission and fusion reactions (thermonuclear bomb).Both bomb types release large quantities of energy from relatively small amounts of.

An introduction to the regulation of both conventional weapons and weapons of mass destruction in international disarmament law. Russia’s annexation of Crimea and involvement in the conflict in eastern Ukraine has in many respects set back post-Cold War improved relations between Russia, the United States, and Europe.

In recent years, a major debate has emerged over the future role of nuclear weapons in world politics.

Focusing attention on the role of nuclear weapons in the post-cold war world, this book argues that unlike the debates which emerged during the cold war period, the contemporary debate has taken place largely in private, with only limited involvement by the general public.

Despite not having been used in anger since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the atomic bomb is still the biggest threat that faces us in the 21st century. As Bill Clinton's first secretary of defense, Les Aspin, aptly put it, "The Cold War is over, the Soviet Union is no more.

But the post-Cold War world is decidedly not post-nuclear." For all the effort to reduce nuclear stockpiles to zero, it. Nuclear strategy - Nuclear strategy - After the Cold War: The demise of the postwar alliance system and the rapid contraction of the Soviet empire in Europe required a rapid reassessment of strategy.

For NATO the traditional calculus was turned upside down. There was no longer a conventionally superior opponent. In all respects, NATO was far more powerful. Broscious, David, “Longing for International Control, Banking on American Superiority: Harry S.

Truman's Approach to Nuclear Weapons,” in Gaddis, John Lewis et al., Cold War Statesmen Confront the Bomb: Nuclear Diplomacy Since (Oxford: Oxford University Press, ), pp. Cited by:   The Cold War nuclear weapons race was primarily a contest between the United States and the Soviet Union, though other countries developed nuclear weapons during this time.

After World War II, the struggle for world power erupted and the United States and the Soviet Union took the lead. Although there remains a residual case for retention of minimal nuclear weapons inventories among the nuclear states, and although some states (Israel, Pakistan) face security threats which go to their very survival and thus make weapons of last resort worth acquiring, the vast majority of the world's nuclear weapons are militarily worthless, and should be destroyed.

Cited by: The Post-Cold War World and Nuclear Weapons Proliferation. The Post-Cold War World and Nuclear Weapons Proliferation. Richard L. Garwin (Personal views of the author) IBM Fellow Emeritus IBM Research Division Thomas J. Watson Research Center P.O. Box Yorktown Heights, NY Tel: () FAX: () since the end of the Second World War.

Nuclear deterrence was the key element of the stalemate between the two blocks during the Cold War. Since the end of this bipolarization, the world is still divided in different nuclear umbrellas under which countries without nuclear weapons beneficiate from the policy of deterrence of a nuclear power.

nuclear weapons and international law in the post cold war world (austin & winfield ); “Nuclear Weapons and Compliance with International Humanitarian Law and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty,” co-authored with John Burroughs and Jonathon Granoff, 34 Fordham Int’l L.J.

();Author: S Balquiedra Marianna. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Here’s how the American system works. 1) The president decides a nuclear strike is necessary. It’s unlikely that the United States would turn to nuclear weapons as a first resort in a conflict.

In this two-part blog post, Government Book Talk takes an in-depth look at several new publications from the U.S. Army War College. (Permission granted for use of United States Army War College Press logo) The U.S.

Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute (SSI) recently has published a few very timely monographs with a primary focus on U.S. national. If we consider the number of nuclear weapons tests, we can see that the Cold War was a very active period of nuclear weapons development.

Although nuclear weapons were only ever used in warfare during the Second World War, there have been over nuclear weapons tests since then.

Most recently North Korea conducted nuclear weapons tests in. In the post-Cold War era, the United States has a strong reason to define the deterrent role of nuclear weapons to be as separate as possible from other means of deterring armed conflict.

Several factors support such a widened gap. The first. These issues involving nuclear weapons in the deterrent role await resolution as international relationships in the post-Cold War world evolve. However, nuclear weapons, at whatever numbers our treaty commitments allow, will remain a cornerstone of U.S.

national security. Staying engaged in the effort to prevent nuclear war requires an understanding of the history of nuclear weapons and the impact their use and production has had on people and the planet.

The lead negotiator of the Iran nuclear agreement takes readers inside the world of international diplomacy. Read these 11 essential books on nuclear. NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND THE ESCALATION OF THE COLD WAR, David Holloway, Stanford University energy under international control.

These negotiations failed. It was national in the five years after World War II. The File Size: KB. Among the central themes of the book is that the U.S. needs a comprehensive nuclear weapons policy for managing a variety of nuclear identified several potential nuclear risks in his discussion, including: dangers leftover from the Cold War nuclear arsenals of the P-5; activities by Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) countries like.

For decades the world was dominated by the Cold War. The armaments race resulted in the US and the Soviet Union together having some 65 nuclear warheads. Questions like development, environment were regarded as “soft issues” - in contrast to the hard strategic issues.

Today we live in a radically transformed world. The United States’ nuclear arsenal is nominally less powerful than it was during the Cold War, having been reduced through two START treaties with Russia (committing to mutual “strategic arms Author: Paul Elie.

The Soviet Union built a similar mix of tactical and strategic forces to deter the United States—and had more than forty thousand nuclear weapons at the end of the Cold War.

The world’s other. 1 International Law In Just and Unjust Wars,11 Michael Walzer considers, and dismisses, the bounds placed by international law, or at least by the UN Charter, on the waging of war.

In a key introductory passage he writes as follows: 4offe and Davis, ‘Less than Zero: Bursting the New Disarmament Bubble’, 90 J Foreign Affairs () 7, at   Abstract.

War made the state, and the state made war, but does this statement hold true today. Will it apply in the future. The consensus is that the absence of major war within the western world, postdid cause the war–state relationship to change, but each became significantly less important to the : Warren Chin.

The United States was the first country to manufacture nuclear weapons and is the only country to have used them in combat, with the separate bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in World War and during the Cold War, it conducted over one thousand nuclear tests and tested many long-range nuclear weapons delivery fusion weapon test: 1 November The concerns and debates within the international community regarding the proliferation of nuclear weapons to more sovereign states in the post-Cold War era have led to many international law instruments in attempts to contain these weapons of mass destruction.

International Law and the Cold War is the first book dedicated to examining the relationship between the Cold War and International Law. The authors adopt a variety of creative approaches - in relation to events and fields such as nuclear war, environmental protection, the Suez crisis and the Lumumba assassination - in order to demonstrate the many ways in which.

This chapter explores the ways in which the nuclear danger has been redefined since the end of the Cold War and the efforts that have been made to strengthen the nuclear order. A global nuclear war is no longer the main worry, but the danger that nuclear weapons will be used in regional conflicts has become more acute.

Nuclear proliferation has become the central issue. America’s Alleged Commitment to “Denuclearization” of the Korean Peninsula. *** During the Cold War, the United States deployed nuclear weapons in South Korea continuously for 33 years, from to The South Korean-based nuclear arsenal peaked at an all-time high of approximately warheads in Since the last US nuclear weapons were.

The book deals with the years from the end of the Cold War until the present. It contains the following sections: The international level with chapters by Steward Patrick, John Oneal, and John Mueller; The Cold War legacy with contributions by Melvyn Leffler, Jeremi Suri, Vladimir Pechatnov, and Odd Arne Westad; The Role of Nuclear Weapons with chapters by David.

The new figures, released by the Pentagon, also highlight a trend — that the current administration has reduced the nuclear stockpile .The Trump presidency and growing risks of a nuclear war Following the post-World War II criminal tribunals at Nuremberg and Tokyo, such questions should not be evaded and will need to .